Author Archive

Pete’s Dragon
Less Songs, More Fur

Disney has no shortage of movies in their catalogue to remake and it appears as if they plan to go through them all. The animated Jungle Book was given an update earlier this year and now Disney brings us a remake of their 1977 live-action/animated hybrid Pete’s Dragon. Director David Lowery has made it clear that the movie is not so much a remake as it is a “re-imagining.” Gone are the songs and much of the plot, but what remains is the heart of the film, a story of a young orphan boy and his friend, who just so happens to be a dragon.


Suicide Squad
Things Are Getting Messy

Inspired by characters from DC Comics and acting as the next chapter in the DC Cinematic Universe following Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Suicide Squad is unique in the superhero genre in that its “heroes” are villains. The movie’s director, David Ayer, has described it as a “comic book version of The Dirty Dozen.” The concept is intriguing and the trailers certainly made it look like an entertaining romp, but unfortunately the first thought that comes to mind when watching the film is “what a mess.”


Jason Bourne
Return of the Amnesiac Spy

The first film to introduce moviegoers to the character of Jason Bourne was 2002’s The Bourne Identity, directed by Doug Liman. That movie was moderately entertaining, but the series really excelled when Paul Greengrass took over for the second and third movies in the franchise, completing a trilogy that did an excellent job of wrapping up the overarching Jason Bourne plotline that was introduced in the original. That was then, as they say, and this is now.


Ghostbusters
They Ain’t Afraid Of No Reboot

The new reboot of Ghostbusters is the second movie this year to get totally trashed by Internet commenters prior to anyone actually seeing the movie. Whereas Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice did not do much to save its reputation upon release, Ghostbusters is likely to fare much better. Why? Principally because it is full of a crucial entertainment element that the DC Comics film just failed to provide: fun.


The BFG
Big Friendly Family Fun

Author Roald Dahl published his children’s novel The BFG in 1982, the same year filmmaker Steven Spielberg released his classic film E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial. Now thirty-four years later, those two powerhouses combine for the movie version of The BFG. Spielberg is directing from a script by the late Melissa Mathison, her first produced script in nearly twenty years. Mathison, by the way, wrote the script for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial.


The Legend of Tarzan
Not so Legendary

The saying goes that “when the legend becomes fact, print the legend.” We all know the legend of author Edgar Rice Burrough’s Tarzan novels, about the boy raised in the jungle by gorillas. The new film adaptation, The Legend of Tarzan, opens after the legend has already been printed and now the character must return to the jungle and re-establish the fact. Whether or not he will be able to do that is never really in doubt.


Finding Dory
A Movie Worth Finding

Unless they star a toy cowboy and his space ranger pal, sequels to Pixar movies have been somewhat underwhelming. Cars 2 and Monsters University were both moderately entertaining, but neither of them came close to approximating the magic of their respective originals. Now the animation giant is revisiting one of their most beloved movies, Finding Nemo. Although it has been a full thirteen years since that movie first hit theaters in 2003, and Finding Dory may be late to the party, it is well worth the wait.


The Nice Guys
A Black Comedy

Hollywood veteran Shane Black got his start writing the screenplays for the Lethal Weapon movies in the eighties and nineties before finally directing his first feature with 2005’s Kiss Kiss Bang Bang. He then joined that movie’s star Robert Downey Jr. in the Marvel Cinematic Universe by writing and directing Iron Man 3, one of the franchise’s most contentious entries to date. His new movie, The Nice Guys, is a return to the buddy-cop action comedy genre in which he first made his name.


Captain America: Civil War
Avengers Disassembled

Earlier this summer, movie audiences were treated to a long-awaited superhero matchup with Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, a movie which felt a lot like a desperate attempt by Warner Bros. to quickly catch the DC Comics movie universe up to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The result was a movie that was almost universally panned by critics and—despite decent box office—audiences. As if that weren’t enough, here comes Marvel’s new movie, also featuring a matchup between two of its main heroes: Iron Man and Captain America. With the two movies having a surprising amount of plot elements in common, Captain America: Civil War feels as if it is Marvel slapping DC right across the face, because everything DC got wrong, Marvel gets oh-so-right.


Keanu
Where’s the Cat?

Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele have already had a success on the small screen with their sketch comedy show, but now that their television show has ended they have set their sights on the big screen. Their first effort is a pseudo-parody of the Keanu Reeves action movie John Wick that they named after that film’s star. Although the title Keanu is obviously a nod to the actor, in the movie it is the name of the film’s true star: pretty much the cutest kitten you have ever seen in your life.


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