Author Archive

Inherent Vice
Lebowski-Esque Detective Work

Having directed films like There Will Be Blood and The Master, director Paul Thomas Anderson is not really known for comedy. Even the film he cast Adam Sandler in, Punch-Drunk Love, is generally remembered as a drama. Anderson’s latest film, Inherent Vice, in which Joaquin Phoenix plays Larry “Doc” Sportello, a drug-fueled private investigator in 1970 Los Angeles, just might be the closest the director ever gets even though the film is still far from being a straight-forward comedy.


Selma
The Story of Dr. King’s March

It is difficult to believe that there has never been a theatrically released movie about Martin Luther King, Jr. There have been a few versions on television, but none that have debuted on the big screen. That changes this year with the release of Selma, an affecting drama about Dr. King’s fight to secure equal voting rights in the south. Director Ava DuVernay focuses on the events leading up to the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, and she creates a powerful drama, somewhat amazingly, considering she did not even have the rights to use any of Dr. King’s famous speeches.


The Imitation Game
A Hero’s Story Told

The characters in the new movie The Imitation Game are constantly reminding us and each other that “sometimes it is the people no one imagines anything of who do the things that no one can imagine.” One such person is the movie’s true-life protagonist, Alan Turing, an English mathematician who broke the Nazi’s Enigma code during World War II while almost single-handedly inventing the computer. Despite this, Turing was chastised by the British government for being gay in a time when that was considered to be a crime. Because of this, the general population—especially that outside the United Kingdom—is not as familiar as they should be with Turing’s accomplishments. This movie, fortunately, is set to change all that.


Unbroken
An Incredible True Story

The new film Unbroken is based on one of those true stories that you cannot believe is actually true–not necessarily because you cannot believe that the events depicted in the movie actually happened, but because it is difficult to believe that someone could suffer through those events and come out in one piece on the other side. The movie is the story of Louis Zamperini, a man who went through hell during World War II and whose story, as tough as it may be to watch, is one that needs to be told.


Into the Woods
From Stage to Screen

With lyrics and music by Stephen Sondheim, the musical Into the Woods first hit the Broadway stage in 1987. Since that time, various people have attempted to adapt the play for the cinema, but none of these projects ever got any further than the script-reading phase. That changes this year as director Rob Marshall finally brings the musical to the big screen with the help of stars like Meryl Streep and Johnny Depp.


The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
The Final Chapter?

The final chapter of The Hobbit trilogy, The Battle of the Five Armies is billed as the final film in director Peter Jackson’s Middle Earth film series that included both this trilogy and the three original Lord of the Rings films. The shortest film in the series, The Battle of the Five Armies works both as a final chapter and as a prequel to the original trilogy. Although certainly a better effort than a prequel trilogy for another major film franchise that shall remain nameless, The Hobbit does not quite stand up to its predecessor. Still, there quite a lot of entertainment value in this final film that is essentially two hours and twenty-four minutes of non-stop battle sequences.


Big Hero 6
Fun with Robots

While the Marvel Cinematic Universe is dominating the live-action box-office with some of the publisher’s more well-known characters, some of the lesser-known characters are finding a home in the animated world. Disney’s latest animated effort is based on a lesser-known Marvel property. They may have been lesser-known characters going in, but the heroes of Big Hero 6 likely won’t remain so obscure for long as this movie is primed to be a major hit.


Nightcrawler
Morals Need Not Apply

Jake Gyllenhaal is quickly becoming one of our better actors. After bursting onto the scene in 2001’s indie cult hit Donnie Darko, Gyllenhaal earned his first and (so far) only Oscar nomination for his performance opposite the late Heath Ledger in Brokeback Mountain. Since then, the actor has delivered many more quality performances in movies like Jarhead, Zodiac, and End of Watch. Sure, he has also had a few duds (Prince of Persia, anyone?), but for the most part the actor has shined. Nightcrawler is just the latest in a long line of good work… and it just might be in best.


St. Vincent
Bill Murray for Sainthood

Bill Murray has been one of our most loved actors for over thirty years now. He’s starred in many a classic comedy and even earned an Oscar nomination for his performance in Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation. Lately, his roles seem to fall into three distinct categories: Wes Anderson character parts, cameos (think Zombieland), and parts designed towards earning him an Oscar, like last year’s Hyde Park on the Hudson. His latest movie, St. Vincent, seems to fall in the latter category.


Men, Women & Children
A Life Lived Through Social Media

Director Jason Reitman started his career off strong with some movies that were able tackle topical issues (the tobacco industry, teenage pregnancy, unemployment) while still serving as great entertainment. But after Thank You For Smoking, Juno, and Up in the Air, while the topical issues are still present, the entertainment value has decreased. His newest movie, Men, Women & Children tackles social media. It’s full of interesting ideas, but it’s just not very fun to watch.


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