Archive for the 'Reviews' Category

America’s Heart and Soul
Cynics, Stand Aside

This is a documentary about ordinary people doing extraordinary things. Those documented in this film are truly living. They march to the proverbial different drummer. They are the thrill seekers that live among us, people who listen to a different economy and a different system of reward. The carrot on their stick is not a paycheck but the doing of their “thing” itself, from making ice cream, to stunt-flying airplanes, milking cows seven days a week (is it all workdays, or is it all weekends?), to metal sculpting, to [insert your own special ability or interest here].

Kingsman: The Secret Service
Spies, Gentleman Spies

There are those out there who feel that the James Bond franchise has gotten a little too serious; that 007 has forgotten himself in his pursuit to be more like Jason Bourne. Fortunately, for those who feel that way, director Matthew Vaughn is on your side. The director of hits like X-Men: First Class and Kick-Ass now brings you Kingsman: The Secret Service, a clear tribute to the earlier Bond films; most notably those of the Roger Moore era. There are gentleman spies, maniacal villains, deadly henchman, and lots and lots of gadgets. The result is a movie that is crazy fun from start to finish.

Lawrence of Arabia

When the restored “Director’s Cut” of Lawrence of Arabia played at Seattle’s legendary Cinerama theater in 1989, I was naturally at the first showing… even though it meant cutting work that afternoon. As the overture began playing to a fairly crowded house, the lights failed to come down… and the projectionist opened the curtain and unblocked the projection aperture. As the dumbfounded and confused audience looked on, timing marks on the 70mm print were projected onto the screen… and then the curtain closed. So much for the intended effect of the overture.

Jupiter Ascending
Sci-Fi Chaos

The Wachowski siblings have had a very up-and-down directing career. After their modestly budged The Matrix became a popular hit in 1999, the directing pair was given carte blanche for its two sequels and the result was a couple of bloated and incoherent movies that were still financial hits. They were reined back in for the ambitious Cloud Atlas, which they co-directed with Tom Tykwer, and which turned out to be very good movie. The critical cred they earned with that movie, however, leads to their latest, Jupiter Ascending, an ambitious and lavish sci-fi spectacle, which unfortunately plays closer to the overblown Matrix sequels than the ground-breaking original.

American Sniper
First Person Shooter

American Sniper is a return to form of sorts for director Clint Eastwood, following a couple of underwhelming releases in J. Edgar and last year’s Jersey Boys. The new film is based on the 2012 book that came with the subtitle “The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History.” The book and the movie tell the story of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, a trained sniper who served four tours in Iraq. During those four tours, Kyle would be credited with 160 confirmed kills, making him, as the subtitle to the book suggests, the most deadly sniper in American history.

A Game of Inches? You Bet!

Coach Bill Courtney is a self-made man from the wrong side of the Deep-Southern tracks. He owns a specialty hardwoods factory, and knows what it means to suck it up when misfortune strikes and rise above it. But the coaching… well, he volunteers at Memphis’ Manassas High, and over the course of six years takes the Tigers from scoring maybe 36 points in an entire winless schedule to a shot at the division title, the playoffs… and maybe, even, an undefeated season.

Inherent Vice
Lebowski-Esque Detective Work

Having directed films like There Will Be Blood and The Master, director Paul Thomas Anderson is not really known for comedy. Even the film he cast Adam Sandler in, Punch-Drunk Love, is generally remembered as a drama. Anderson’s latest film, Inherent Vice, in which Joaquin Phoenix plays Larry “Doc” Sportello, a drug-fueled private investigator in 1970 Los Angeles, just might be the closest the director ever gets even though the film is still far from being a straight-forward comedy.

The Story of Dr. King’s March

It is difficult to believe that there has never been a theatrically released movie about Martin Luther King, Jr. There have been a few versions on television, but none that have debuted on the big screen. That changes this year with the release of Selma, an affecting drama about Dr. King’s fight to secure equal voting rights in the south. Director Ava DuVernay focuses on the events leading up to the historic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, and she creates a powerful drama, somewhat amazingly, considering she did not even have the rights to use any of Dr. King’s famous speeches.

The Imitation Game
A Hero’s Story Told

The characters in the new movie The Imitation Game are constantly reminding us and each other that “sometimes it is the people no one imagines anything of who do the things that no one can imagine.” One such person is the movie’s true-life protagonist, Alan Turing, an English mathematician who broke the Nazi’s Enigma code during World War II while almost single-handedly inventing the computer. Despite this, Turing was chastised by the British government for being gay in a time when that was considered to be a crime. Because of this, the general population—especially that outside the United Kingdom—is not as familiar as they should be with Turing’s accomplishments. This movie, fortunately, is set to change all that.

An Incredible True Story

The new film Unbroken is based on one of those true stories that you cannot believe is actually true–not necessarily because you cannot believe that the events depicted in the movie actually happened, but because it is difficult to believe that someone could suffer through those events and come out in one piece on the other side. The movie is the story of Louis Zamperini, a man who went through hell during World War II and whose story, as tough as it may be to watch, is one that needs to be told.

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